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Equine Colours- Base Colours by Kholran Equine Colours- Base Colours by Kholran
Part One

This image illustrates the three "Base" colours that all other colours act upon. Yes, I am aware that Bay is not a true base, but when considering the dilutions, it makes sense to call it a base. So I am.

Part Two: The Cream Gene [link]
Part Three: The Champagne Gene [link]
Part Four: The Dun Gene [link]
Part Five: The Silver Gene [link]
Part Six: White Patterns [link]
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:iconiceeternity:
IceEternity Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Brown and White are also base colors, thought they aren't diluted.

Also, I'd like to add that with all base colors, they are marked with a CC in the genetic code, showing that they aren't diluted in any way.  CC controls dilution.

So a chestnut would be ee CC, a black being EE (Ee) CC, and a Bay being EE(Ee) AA(Aa) CC.

The Bay has both the EE and AA as it has black hairs (which is what the EE controls).  AA is the agouti gene, which means all the black is restricted to the points (legs, muzzle, ears, mane, and tail).  However, it still contains the CC and can be diluted, making it a Base color.

Just figured I'd add that in case anyone wanted further explanation on the subject. ^^
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2015
CC only references Cream, not any other dilute, and generally is only used on testing, because notation like CC (no cream), CCr (heterozygous cream), and CrCr (homozygous cream) are way way too easy to confuse. UC Davis uses N instead of C which helps (N/N no cream, N/Cr heterozygous cream and Cr/Cr homozygous cream). I'm not a fan of using CC to denote "no cream", so I never write it that way.

Technically there are only two true Base colours, black and red, as is stated on the reference. Bay is not a true base, it's just easier to consider it one for all the other colour references. ALL other colours, including Brown (EE or Ee plus the agouti type At/At) and dominant white (W1 through W11) act on either ee or EE/Ee bases and are not bases themselves.

The fun thing about Agouti is how many offshoots there are. There's A (normal agouti, causes a black horse to be bay), A+ (wild bay- black on the legs is most concentrated on the joints and not on the cannon bones) and At (brown- seal brown/black and tan). Some day I'll have to add a page just for Brown, since Brown + the various other dilutes and modifiers can yield some really interesting results. However it still stands that neither brown nor bay is a true base, just a modified Black.

I'm not sure if that clears anything up or just makes it even more complicated. I was purposely trying to keep these refs simplified lol
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:iconiceeternity:
IceEternity Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Ahh, okay.  

I've really only been studying horse genetics because our Horse Bowl team has been trying to figure it out. XD  Our coach is keeping it simple, but I already understand everything she's been teaching, so I was looking for some more indepth info.

In Horse Bowl we have the 5 basic coat colors, though in genetics I understand how only two (or three) are considered basic.

She hadn't taught us about the different offshoots of Agouti, however, so thanks for the extra information!
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2015
That's really cool your coach is teaching you about colours! There are a lot of great resources out there to teach yourself too. Colour genetics are so interesting, and there are some amazing combinations out there :)
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:iconiceeternity:
IceEternity Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
There certainly is!  I actually found a great resource to get some more info from, and that's been really helpful.

Once again, thanks ;)
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:iconhorseluver1912:
horseluver1912 Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I love your charts, and how you give a bit of info on each color! :)
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2014
Thank you! I'm glad you like them :)
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:iconhorseluver1912:
horseluver1912 Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Keep up the great charts! :)
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2014
I hope to add a couple more of them eventually. Just gotta find the time!
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:iconhorseluver1912:
horseluver1912 Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Alright awesome :)
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:iconsagawolf:
SagaWolf Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Sooooo helpful for a newbie like me trying to nail down the various colors. I'm going to go ahead and fave the whole series! Thank you so much for providing this :D It's amazing! 
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
You're welcome! I'm just glad people can use it :)
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:icontwobitstock:
TwoBitStock Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2012
love!:) How do you make theses!?faved it!
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2012
Photoshop Elements, a Wacom tablet, and a steady hand lol
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:icontwobitstock:
TwoBitStock Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2012
cool!:) and lol! okay!
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:iconamayatenjo:
AmayaTenjo Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2012
I think I am going to fav all these, its good info ^^

So according to this, Black is dominant, and chestnut is recesive.

SO, that means that the parents of a chestnut have to be at least het for it.

But when these colors are "diluted" they're just codominant traits.
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2012
Correct. Two chestnuts bred together will never have black-based offspring. A homozygous black will never have a red-based foal, even if bred to a chestnut.

All the other genes affect the base to give us the wide range of colours we see. Most of the modifiers and dilutions are single-gene dominant, meaning that the horse looks exactly the same whether it's homozygous or heterozygous. Cream is really the only dilution that has a visible difference between one copy of the gene, and two.
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:iconamayatenjo:
AmayaTenjo Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2012
Thanks ^^

It helps to already understand genetics. It's to the point where I don't understand unless the words, heterozygous, homozygous, recessive, or codominant are used.
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:icontenshinekoowo:
TenshinekoOwO Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Hey. This deviation is perfect for submitting to my group :iconclub-bicolour:. Wanna join and submit it? It really needs members.
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:icontomboianimalmel:
tomboianimalmel Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
great color base. I'm probey going to use it for colors. I'll credit you when it's up for the colors
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:iconraccoon83:
Raccoon83 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I am using your equine color study to post in my fotolog and blog, to show to my brazilian friends oK?!
I add there your adress here in this site and all the credits...

the links are:

[link]

[link]
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2009
Thanks for letting me know and for crediting :)
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:iconraccoon83:
Raccoon83 Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
=D ok!
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:icondreamhorsestudios:
DreamHorseStudios Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is an excellent series in that it provides just enough genetics information for those with a budding interest to learn a bit, while giving artists a very well drawn and easy-to-use quick reference guide. Thanks! :heart:
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:iconkholran:
Kholran Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2009
You're welcome :) More parts of the series are on the way XD
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